Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
25 juillet 2009 6 25 /07 /juillet /2009 14:14
Je n'ai pas encore complètement déterminé les critères qui me font choisir ce blog ou Tempto etiam pour y mettre des citations. Si quelqu'un voit une régularité évidente qui méchappe, qu'il n'hésite pas à me déciller les yeux...
[T]he two principles, noble folly and base wisdom, exist side by side in nearly every human being. If you look into your own mind, which are you, Don Quixote or Sancho Panza? Almost certainly you are both. There is one part of you
that wishes to be a hero or a saint, but another part of you is a little fat man who sees very clearly the advantages of staying alive with a whole skin. He is your unofficial self, the voice of the belly protesting against the soul. His tastes lie towards safety, soft beds, no work, pots of beer and women with 'voluptuous' figures. (...) Whether you allow yourself to be influenced by him is a different question. But it is simply a lie to say that he is not part of you, just as it is a lie to say that Don Quixote is not part of you either, though most of what is said and written consists of one lie or the other, usually the first.
George Orwell, The Art of Donald McGill, 1941
Repost 0
Published by Abie - dans Guillemets
commenter cet article
20 juillet 2009 1 20 /07 /juillet /2009 11:56
Le sargue, poisson prodigieusement lubrique (...), une fois sorti de l'eau, se meurt d'amour pour les épouses des autres et est possédé d'un amour obscène pour les chèvres.

Oswald Croll, Traité des signatures, trad. Sandra Mouton.
Repost 0
Published by Abie - dans Guillemets
commenter cet article
9 juillet 2009 4 09 /07 /juillet /2009 14:02
Je viens de regarder un TED talk de Helen Fisher sur la neuropsychologie de la pulsion amoureuse, qu'elle distingue de la pulsion sexuelle et de l'affection. J'y ai trouvé des choses plutôt intéressantes, même si je n'ai pas été entièrement convaincue par certains aspects (à sa décharge, elle n'avait que vingt minutes, et je viens de terminer Le Sexe, l'homme et l'évolution de Picq et Brenot).
Dans la plus pure tradition de ce genre de conférence, elle conclut par une histoire, rapportée donc peut-être fausse.... Ma se non è vero, è bene trovato...

But I want to tell you a story (...). It was a graduate student (...) and this graduate student was madly in love with another graduate student, and she was not in love with him. And they were all at a conference in Beijing.
And he knew from our work that if you go and do something very novel with somebody, you can drive up the dopamine in the brain. And perhaps trigger this brain system for romantic love. 
So he decided he'd put science to work, and he invited this girl to go off on a rickshaw ride with him. And sure enough -- I've never been in one, but apparently they go all around the buses and the trucks and it's crazy and it's noisy and it's exciting. And he figured that this would drive up the dopamine, and she would fall in love with him.
So off they go and she's squealing and squeezing him and laughing and having a wonderful time.
An hour later they get down off of the rickshaw, and she throws her hands up and she says, "Wasn't that wonderful?" ,
"And wasn't that rickshaw driver handsome!"


PS : Je découvre qu'il est possible d'avoir des sous-titres français pour pas mal des vidéos des TED talks, n'hésitez pas à en profiter !
PS2 : Le titre est un hommage à Burns.

Repost 0
Published by Abie - dans Guillemets
commenter cet article
5 juillet 2009 7 05 /07 /juillet /2009 10:01
Le temps passé à ne rien faire se dépose en strates. En séchant, ces strates se solidifient. Quiconque ne parvient pas à s'en libérer à temps finit, un beau jour, par ne plus pouvoir bouger et se retrouve pris au piège.

Matthias Zschokke, Maurice à la poule, éditions Zoé, traduit de l'allemand par Patricia Zurcher.
Citation tirée de la chronique du Canard enchaîné du 1er juillet 2009.
Repost 0
Published by Abie - dans Guillemets
commenter cet article
20 juin 2009 6 20 /06 /juin /2009 20:05
Décidément, lire des ouvrages de gens d'esprit expose au risque de multiplier les citations, l'exemple ultime de la chose étant les romans et les pièces d'Oscar Wilde, qui ne sont parfois qu'un prétexte à peine voilé pour ses brillants aphorismes.
Le cas de Mark Twain déjà évoqué est loin d'être aussi sévère, et ménage un peu le lecteur, mais la récolte de citations n'en est pas maigre pour autant. Et pas de traduction cette fois-ci, je laisse les non-Anglophones se référer au travail de professionnels...


Unlimited power is the ideal thing when it is in safe hands. The despotism of heaven is the one absolutely perfect government. An earthly despotism would be the absolutely perfect earthly government, if the conditions were the same, namely, the despot the perfectest individual of the human race, and his lease of life perpetual. But as a perishable perfect man must die, and leave his despotism in the hands of an imperfect successor, an earthly despotism is not merely a bad form of government, it is the worst form that is possible.
(Ch. X)

Training—training is everything; training is all there is to a person. We speak of nature; it is folly; there is no such thing as nature; what we call by that misleading name is merely heredity and training. We have no thoughts of our own, no opinions of our own; they are transmitted to us, trained into us. All that is original in us, and therefore fairly creditable or discreditable to us, can be covered up and hidden by the point of a cambric needle, all the rest being atoms contributed by, and inherited from, a procession of ancestors that stretches back a billion years to the Adam-clam or grasshopper or monkey from whom our race has been so tediously and ostentatiously and unprofitably developed.

(Ch. XVIII)


I only stand to this: I have noticed my conscience for many years, and I know it is more trouble and bother to me than anything else I started with. I suppose that in the beginning I prized it, because we prize anything that is ours; and yet how foolish it was to think so. If we look at it in another way, we see how absurd it is: if I had an anvil in me would I prize it? Of course not. And yet when you come to think, there is no real difference between a conscience and an anvil—I mean for comfort. I have noticed it a thousand times. And you could dissolve an anvil with acids, when you couldn't stand it any longer; but there isn't any way that you can work off a conscience.
(Ch. XVIII)


Intellectual "work" is misnamed; it is a pleasure, a dissipation, and is its own highest reward. The poorest paid architect, engineer, general, author, sculptor, painter, lecturer, advocate, legislator, actor, preacher, singer is constructively in heaven when he is at work; and as for the musician with the fiddle-bow in his hand who sits in the midst of a great orchestra with the ebbing and flowing tides of divine sound washing over him—why, certainly, he is at work, if you wish to call it that, but lord, it's a sarcasm just the same. The law of work does seem utterly unfair—but there it is, and nothing can change it: the higher the pay in enjoyment the worker gets out of it, the higher shall be his pay in cash, also.

(Ch. XXVIII)

I urged that kings were dangerous. He said, then have cats. He was sure that a royal family of cats would answer every purpose. They would be as useful as any other royal family, they would know as much, they would have the same virtues and the same treacheries, the same disposition to get up shindies with other royal cats, they would be laughably vain and absurd and never know it, they would be wholly inexpensive; (...). "And as a rule," said he, in his neat modern English, "the character of these cats would be considerably above the character of the average king, and this would be an immense moral advantage to the nation, for the reason that a nation always models its morals after its monarch's. The worship of royalty being founded in unreason, these graceful and harmless cats would easily become as sacred as any other royalties, and indeed more so, because it would presently be noticed that they hanged nobody, beheaded nobody, imprisoned nobody, inflicted no cruelties or injustices of any sort, and so must be worthy of a deeper love and reverence than the customary human king, and would certainly get it.

(Ch. XL)




Repost 0
Published by Abie - dans Guillemets
commenter cet article
15 juin 2009 1 15 /06 /juin /2009 11:34
The first thing you want in a new country, is a patent office; then work up your school system; and after that, out with your paper.

La première chose à avoir dans un pays neuf, c'est un bureau des brevets ; ensuite travaille à ton système éducatif ; et après ça, hop, ton journal.


Mark Twain, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Dover Publications, 2001, p. 43.
(Traduction par les soins de mon pied gauche, qui s'excuse auprès de l'auteur.)
Repost 0
Published by Abie - dans Guillemets
commenter cet article
4 juin 2009 4 04 /06 /juin /2009 00:01
Encore un petit article sur Fufu de Coulanges à la suite du précédent, avant de passer à autre chose, promis...
L'un des objectifs de l'auteur est de nous montrer qu'on fait une erreur grave en comprenant les mots antiques dans leur acception actuelle, et que les gréco-romains primitifs avaient une façon de penser qui n'avait pas grand'chose avec la notre.

Deux petites citations pour illustrer son propos :

À Athènes, le sort désignait les hommes qui devaient prendre part au repas commun, et la loi punissait sévèrement ceux qui refusaient de s'acquitter de ce devoir.Les citoyens qui s'asseyaient à la table sacrée étaient revêtus momentanément d'un caractère sacerdotal ; on les appelait parasites ; ce mot, qui devint plus tard un terme, de mépris, commença par être un titre sacré.


La législation athénienne visait manifestement à ce que la fille, faute d'être héritière, épousât au moins l'héritier. Si, par exemple, le défunt avait laissé un fils et une fille, la loi autorisait le mariage entre le frère et la soeur, pourvu qu'ils ne fussent pas nés de la même mère. Le frère, seul héritier, pouvait à son choix épouser sa soeur ou la doter*.
* Il faut noter que la loi ne permettait pas d'épouser un frère utérin ou un frère émancipé. On ne pouvait épouser que le frère consanguin, car celui-là seul était héritier du père.



(Extraits de La Cité antique, Champs Flammarion, 1984, pages 180 et 81-82 respectivement.)

 
Repost 0
Published by Abie - dans Guillemets
commenter cet article
26 mai 2009 2 26 /05 /mai /2009 15:42
" Who is that long-haired fellow?" is the question invariably asked about any man whose visits to the barber are infrequent. "Must be an artist or a music-man," is the frequent commentary.

Manners for Men de Mrs. Humphrey (Madge de Truth), p.34, feuilleté à Shakespeare & Co.
Repost 0
Published by Abie - dans Guillemets
commenter cet article
24 mai 2009 7 24 /05 /mai /2009 12:00
[L]'étude des transformations [des sociétés] nous affranchit de deux sentiments inverses, mais également dangereux pour l'activité. L'un est l'impression qu'un individu est impuissant à remuer cette masse énorme d'hommes qui forment une société : c'est un sentiment d'impuissance qui mène au découragement et à l'inaction. L'autre est l'impression que la masse humaine évolue toute seule, que le progrès est inévitable : d'où sort la conclusion que l'individu n'a pas besoind e s'en occuper ; le résultat est le quiétisme social et l'inaction.
Au contraire, l'homme instruit par l'histoire sait que la société peut être transformée par l'opinion, que l'opinion ne se modfiera pas toute seule et qu'un seul individu est impuissant à la changer. Mais il sait que plusieurs hommes, opérant ensemble dans le même sens, peuvent modifier l'opinion. Cette connaissance lui donne le sentiment de son pouvoir, la conscience de son devoir et la règle de son activité, qui est d'aider la transformation de la société  dans le sens qu'il regarde comme le plus avantageux.

Charles Seignebos, «L'enseignement de l'histoire comme instrument d'éducation politique »
cité par Antoine Prost dans Douze leçons d'histoire, Paris, Points Histoire, Seuil, 1996.

Ah, et vous serez amusés d'apprendre que la notice du prochain concours de Lettres des ENS est tombée, et que parmi les oeuvres au programmes en littérature française, il y a... La princesse de Clèves !
Repost 0
Published by Abie - dans Guillemets
commenter cet article
17 mars 2009 2 17 /03 /mars /2009 14:19
There is so much wretchedness in the world, that we may safely take the word of any mortal professing to need our assistance; and, even should we be deceived, still the good to ourselves resulting from a kind act is worth more than the trifle by which we purchase it.
cité par Phila chez  Echidne of the Snakes.
Voilà la sagesse. Car si prendre la bonne foi comme hypothèse par défaut mène à quelques désillusions, ne pas le faire est une résignation à la paranoia.

Nota : Bli fait remarquer à raison que cette démarche vaut si on demande votre aide, pas si on veut vous vendre quelque chose...
Repost 0
Published by Abie - dans Guillemets
commenter cet article

Edito

Soyez les bienvenus sur ce petit blog sans ligne éditoriale fixe, qui échoue à mourir depuis 2005.
La fréquence de mise à jour se veut quotidienne au mieux (par ce que je suis de nature optimiste), trimestrielle au pire (parce que je suis velléitaire bien plus encore).

Alea jacta est :


Aussi :



Ordo Ab Chao